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Heat Health PSA

Dr. Feelgood here sending out a friendly PSA: IT’S HOT!  

That means we need everyone to take some precautions so you don’t succumb to the heat.

First of all use common sense, try to avoid heavy work in the sun from 11-4, that is when it is the hottest and you are likely to sweat more than you can drink. Maybe set up in the woods and unload in the morning and late afternoon.

If you are working outside in the hottest time of day, you can take precautions to prevent heat exhaustion and other heat-related illnesses. When temperatures climb, remember to:

  • Wear loose fitting, lightweight clothing. Wearing excess clothing or clothing that fits tightly won’t allow your body to cool properly.
  • Protect against sunburn. Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself, so protect yourself outdoors with a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply sunscreen generously, and reapply every two hours — or more often if you’re swimming or sweating.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Staying hydrated will help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature.
  • Take extra precautions with certain medications. Be on the lookout for heat-related problems if you take medications that can affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat. (for example heart medications)
  • Never leave anyone (or your perishable foods) in a parked car. When parked in the sun, the temperature in your car can rise 20 degrees Fahrenheit (more than 6.7 C) in 10 minutes. It’s not safe to leave a person in a parked car in warm or hot weather, even if the windows are cracked or the car is in shade. When your car is parked, keep it locked to prevent a child from getting inside.
  • Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day. If you can’t avoid strenuous activity in hot weather, drink fluids and rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to schedule exercise or physical labor for cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or evening.
  • Be cautious if you’re at increased risk. If you take medications or have a condition that increases your risk of heat-related problems, such as a history of previous heat illness, avoid the heat and act quickly if you notice symptoms of overheating. If you participate in a strenuous sporting event or activity in hot weather, be sure to rest when you need to and ask for help if you do not feel well.
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